Both parties go too far with election bills; bipartisan compromise needed

Al Cross

Al Cross is a professor in the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media and director of its Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues. His opinions are his own, not UK’s. He was the longest-serving political writer for the Louisville Courier Journal (1989-2004) and national president of the Society of Professional Journalists in 2001-02. You can find him on Twitter at @ruralj.

This column first ran in the Northern Kentucky Tribune.

The Democrats’ huge bill needs a lot of work. It tries to do too much in some cases, and not enough in others.
By Al Cross
McConnell at least needs to be repeating his statement that the election was legitimate. As a senior member of our government, he has a responsibility to make it worthy of our confidence.
By Al Cross
Politics, like horse racing, is worthy of some oddsmaking in the Bluegrass state.
By Al Cross
The Kentucky senator from Manchester sponsored legislation authorizing a tax-increment-financing plan to help redevelop economically depressed and heavily Black western Louisville. He also sponsored a bill to limit no-knock warrants.
By Al Cross
He loved the clash of opinions, but he valued the facts above anything else, and he kept his mind open to facts that might change it. That is the journalism of good faith — driven by facts, not by opinion, and by a search for the truth.
By Al Cross
The House passed a bill to reduce government openness in a manner that was far from open. Now it appears greased for passage in the Senate.
By Al Cross
Longtime Kentucky columnist Al Cross sees McConnell as a careful and canny political player of The Long Game.
By Al Cross
Mitch McConnell
McConnell showed he still cares about the GOP's future when he denounced the “loony lies” of freshman Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene and stood up for Rep. Liz Cheney, whose vote to impeach Trump put her House leadership post at risk.
By Al Cross
Mitch McConnell
Early in the pandemic, Beshear made up for his steep learning curve and his shortage of smooth articulation with an earnestness that seemed to reassure the public. But pandemic fatigue set in, the issues got tougher, and Republicans staked out positions at odds with the Democratic governor.
By Al Cross
A public break with an unpredictable president could split the Republican Party into Trump and anti-Trump factions, alienating Trump’s base from party leaders.
By Al Cross
Stay Informed

Get our latest headlines delivered to your inbox.